intervista e video di – GIUEPPE ORIGO

traduzioni di – Leandro Bonan Julia Perry

.

.

ENGLISH [intervista in italiano disponibile a fondo pagina]

.

[G.O] I’m luckily here with Mr. Roger Ballen in Johannesburg. I’m so proud to be here with you and thank you very much for accepting our interview.

[R.B.] A great pleasure.

.

Just a few questions about your work. The first is, that in your work as an artist in regards to all your portraits, it seems that you focus more […] on a psychological aspect than an aesthetic one. So, could you please explain [to] us the relationship between aesthetics and psychological studies in your pictures?”

Well this is a good question. I think the issue is that the […] aesthetic is psychological. So it’s not that the work isn’t aesthetic, the work is psychologically aesthetic. So I think that’s an important differentiation to make. If the work has a lasting value to it, the work continues to give people impact that has some sort of […] an aesthetic that affects their mind one way or another. So one can’t necessarily differentiate the psychological from the aesthetic in the work.

.

I want to know, also, why do you only use black and white? Why not colors?

On the last generation I’ve grown up in a black and white world. It’s hard to differentiate my work from the fact that they’re in black and white. The relationship, the formal relationship is inseparable, I mean, on a more specific basis, I like the fact that black and white is a very pure, very condense, very formally abstract, very formally pure and abstract at the same time. So, the issue is that I actually don’t have any interest in color photography, I like colored painting, I find colored photography in a way, fake. Why? Why do I feel it’s fake? Because in photography, the colors somehow convey the concept of reality. People say ‘Well this is the way it is, this is the way it looks like’ but what they’re looking at is photographic colors. So what I feel is like a cognitive dissonance taking place between the work and the mind of the viewer that what they see is actually not the way it is.

.

Johannesburg is like a strange city for me because I’ve never come here and I want to know from you, what is Johannesburg today? And who inhabits it?

Well, I guess in a way, Johannesburg reflects the dynamics of the country, maybe better than any other place in South Africa. Well, what are the dynamics in South Africa? The biggest dynamic is the huge, huge cultural economic class differences here and what exists now isn’t really much different than it was fifty years ago during the apartheid period, there are always these huge differences between the haves and have-nots, and there [are] always these huge cultural differences here between the sub cult, European culture, the Western culture, and the African culture. And so, this is really I think, a real defining edge to this country and I think on top of that what has occurred since the fall of the apartheid here is you get this global culture that’s come in here and transformed the way people see themselves and see where they’d like to go with their futures so you have this added ingredient, if you want to say, that also transforms what we have here. So, ultimately you have a link between the global culture, the Apple, the iPod, the car culture, the European culture which is tied to the international cultural, plus the colonial culture. And then you have the African culture which is also divided up between the middle class and the elite that run the country and the preponderance of people who are poor and traditional in their own way.

.

And why did you choose Johannesburg to live in?

Well, I guess for a number of reasons. I first came here in 1974 as a young man, I hitch hiked to Cape Town and I spent about a year or two here and then I made an overland ship from Istanbul to New Guinea, which took me a couple years. I went back to America in the late 70s and did a PhD in geology and I practiced, I came back here firstly, for three reasons perhaps. One, it was a good place to do geological work. South Africa is like the South Arabia of minerals in the world. Two, I found a really interesting place because of the dichotomy that I found here when I first came here, between the first world, the colonial world, and the African third world. I found this very interesting, this dynamic, one could live like in America or in a first world but also be involved in a third world situation which was quite inspiring to me at the time, and I met my future wife on my first visit, who was in Johannesburg and then right after I did my PhD I got an interesting job here so that’s what brought me here, again, in 1982, I came here permanently.

.

For an artist, what is this city?

Look, it’s really hard to say because I can’t get into anybody’s mind, it’s really hard to understand what motivates anybody in the hundreds of people that consider themselves artists, from people that paint pictures of flowers, pretty flowers, to people who walk around the city and try to pain or photograph people in desperate situations and people who write about their country in sometimes a fictional way and sometimes a factual way, so really it is always difficult to know what motivates people. For me, I think, an artist is about trying to define your life, it’s a way of expressing your identity in one way or another. Some people like to express their identity through a political reflection and political expressions, and others like myself are interested in a more psychological, philosophical basis of human existence.

.

I want to know what kind of relationship exists between you and the subjects you capture in your portraits.

Well, the first thing is that the relationship has always been very good, you couldn’t work in the places that I’ve worked in for the last 30 years without having a good relationship, it would be absolutely impossible for the places that I work in, they’re quite dangerous, people are on the street, people have no money, people are trying to survive, I’ve met people who are murdering other people so you know, if you don’t have a good relationship and you can’t get along with them then you can’t do the projects that I’m doing so the relationships are always seen as a two way street and I’ve tried to help the people as best as I can as one human being and they enjoy being around me in some way or another, so you know it’s always been a mutual relationship and I can say to this day that hundreds and hundreds of people contact me regularly and ask me what I’m doing, when I’m coming to see them again, the people that I work with really like me and I really like the people I work with, that’s why I continue to do this because I have an affinity to the type of people that I work with.

.

Because the first time I saw your works, I thought immediately […] about Alejandro Jodorowski. You know in his films there’s this leitmotif of creep. Why do you choose, and you continue, to present to your audience this creepy aesthetic?

The thing is, you really can’t answer the question because people, it’s like saying why do you like the color red, blue, or purple, you know, it’s part of who I am and if you go back many years, this is why it’s very interesting for me right now when I’m doing this retrospective look, and I can see from the time I was in my late teens to early twenties that I was involved with these type of people, somehow or another, so it’s just part of my identity, part of my essence. It’s hard for me to say, you know, why I’m attracted to them in some way or another. You know, it’s really; really crucial to understand this, I think a lot of people don’t understand this aspect of photography. You know, anybody could walk anywhere in the world, whether it’s Rome, whether it’s Milan, whether it’s New York, whether it’s Johannesburg, and find interesting subjects that look like some of my subjects in some way or another, and I’ve always told other that people that finding the subject you’re only like five percent there, you’re not ninety-five percent there, you’re five percent there so now you have a subject, you’ve found somebody, ‘Oh, this person looks interesting’, so what are you going to do with them now? What are you going to do with them? So, you know, it’s like saying ‘Okay, I think this is a beautiful sunset, or this is a beautiful mountain or this smells nice’ and to write a work of poetry or philosophy, there’s a big difference between finding something that has those attributes and transforming it into an aesthetic object that has some long term value, it’s a huge difference. So what you’re looking at is an aesthetic rather than an objectivity.

.

Your last work was published in 2014: “Asylum of the Birds”. The leitmotiv are the birds. You are not the first artist, of course, to talk about the birds, it’s maybe too easy of a comparison to talk about Alfred Hitchcock, but Alfred Hitchcock was ornithophobic and he was afraid of birds. At the end of “Outland” you said you got another kind of relation with birds, you said you admire birds. Could you please speak to us about “Asylum of the Birds” and your relation with these animals?

I think I like anything in nature. […] I have pet snakes, pet spiders, so a lot of the things that people don’t like. I like everything, so there’s nothing I don’t really like. I have an affinity to everything in the natural world and so, you know, I think I used birds as a metaphor. If you go back to the bible, or even before the bible, the birds have a very archetypal metaphor, they’re heavenly, they’re signs of pureness, they link the heavens to the Earth so there’s something archetypal about them and wherever you go in the world the archetype’s more or less the same. They represent something about the heavens and so what I tried to do in this book is link the heavens, the symbol of the heavens, the bird, with the Roger Ballen world, with the Roger Ballen space, with the Roger Ballen aesthetic and link them in some way through the transformation of the camera and I created another aesthetic through this link, through this relationship, between the metaphor of the birds and the metaphor of the Roger Ballen space and that’s the essence of the work, to try to understand that metaphor. That metaphor, well, first of all, these pictures are all different, but once you to dig deeply and understand a metaphor for yourself, there’s multiple metaphors but this metaphor might be quite clear if everyone ponders it.

.

Last question I’d like to ask you: if you look in the mirror at yourself, what do you see?

Well, it’s a good question because I do this every morning and quite a lot during the day to go to the men’s room or whatever, well I think there are two things that I see, two things that go through my mind. One is, is this really me? Because the mirror isn’t necessarily a reflection of you, it’s based on the physics of a mirror, so what you look at isn’t necessarily you, it’s the physics of the mirror and the physics of the mind. The second thing that I guess I’m always pondering is when I look at myself, I’m 65 right now and I’m pondering that I’m getting older everyday and the signs of age are creeping on me and I need to understand and be focused on the things that are important to me in life right now.

.

.

ITALIANO

.

E’ un onore essere qui con lei, e grazie per aver accettato la nostra intervista

Il piacere è tutto mio.

.

Vorrei iniziare con alcune domande riguardo il suo lavoro. La prima: nel suo lavoro artistico,  specialmente nei ritratti, pare che lei si concentri più sull’aspetto psicologico che su quello estetico. Potrebbe spiegarci la relazione tra studi estetici e psicologici nelle sue opere?

Senz’altro una buona domanda. Credo che la chiave sia che la bellezza è psicologica. Quindi non si può dire che un ritratto non sia esteticamente bello, al massimo è psicologicamente estetico. Credo sia una distinzione importante da fare. Se un’opera è di qualche valore artistico, continua ad influenzare le persone sia a livello estetico che mentale. Quindi non si deve necessariamente distinguere nelle mie opere la dimensione estetica da quella psicologica.

.

Vorrei sapere, anche, perché usa soltanto bianco e nero. Perché non i colori?

Sono della generazione che è cresciuta in un mondo in bianco e nero. E’ difficile pensare alle mie opere prescindendo dal loro essere in bianco e nero. La relazione, il rapporto formale è inseparabile. Ciò che voglio dire è che mi piace che bianco e nero siano molto puri, essenziali, formalmente astratti: formalmente puri e astratti al tempo stesso. E per ciò non ho nessun interesse nella fotografia a colori. Mi piacciono molto quadri a colori, ma trovo le fotografie a colori finte, in un certo modo. Perché? Perché mi sembrano finte? Perché  nella fotografia, i colori trasmettono in qualche modo il concetto di realtà, si sostituiscono alla realtà che rappresentano. La gente dice di ammirare l’immagine catturata nello scatto, ma realtà sta ammirando i colori della fotografia. Io avverto questa dissonanza cognitiva che ha luogo tra l’opera in sé e la mente dell’osservatore che vede le cose come in realtà non sono.

.

La terza domanda riguarda questa città. È una città piuttosto strana per me perché non ci sono mai stato prima e vorrei sapere da lei: com’è Johannesburg oggi? Chi ci vive?

Beh, credo che Johannesburg rispecchi in un certo modo le dinamiche del paese, probabilmente meglio di ogni altro luogo in Sud Africa. Quali sono le dinamiche in Sud Africa? La più grande è senz’altro l’enorme, enorme differenza culturale ed economica tra le classi sociali e questo non è poi davvero cambiato rispetto a cinquant’anni fa, durante il periodo dell’apartheid. Ci sono sempre differenze enormi tra chi ha e chi non ha e  ci sono enormi differenze culturali tra diverse sub-culture: quella Europea, quella Occidentale e quella Africana. E questa è, io credo, davvero una caratteristica che definisce la natura di questo paese. A ciò aggiungi ciò che è successo dalla fine dell’apartheid: la diffusione della cultura globale qui è stata capillare e ha trasformato il modo in cui le persone di vedono e vedono cosa vorrebbero fare delle loro vite in futuro. E questo nuovo ingrediente si è aggiunto e ha trasformato, se vogliamo, anche la nostra quotidianità. Quindi alla fine abbiamo legami con la cultura globale, abbiamo Apple, l’iPod, la cultura delle automobili, quella Europea che è legata all’internazionalizzazione dei costumi, e la cultura coloniale. E poi c’è pure la cultura Africana, che è  divisa tra quella del ceto medio e dell’élite che governa il paese, e quella della maggioranza delle persone, che sono povere e tradizionaliste nel loro modo particolare e caratteristico.

.

E perché ha scelto di vivere a Johannesburg?

Beh, credo per una serie di ragioni diverse. Sono arrivato qui quando ero giovane, nel 1974, facendo autostop fino a Città del Capo e ho passato un anno o due qui. Poi ho fatto un viaggio in nave, da Istanbul in Nuova Guinea, che è durato un paio d’anni. Sono tornato in America alla fine degli anni Settanta e ho preso un dottorato in geologia. Sono finito qui per tre ragioni principali. La prima è che era un buon posto per fare ricerche geologiche. Il Sud Africa è un po’ l’Arabia Saudita dei minerali. Seconda ragione era che trovavo questo stato molto interessante per la dicotomia che vi trovai la prima volta, tra il primo mondo, il mondo coloniale, e il terzo mondo. Trovavo la dinamica davvero interessante, uno potrebbe vivere come in America ma essere anche coinvolto in situazioni da terzo mondo. Trovavo la situazione fonte di ispirazione, e ho incontrato la mia futura moglie durante la mia prima visita, a Johannesburg. Giusto dopo il mio dottorato ottenni un lavoro interessante che mi  condusse qui, nel 1982, questa volta in modo permanente.

 .

Che città è per un artista?

 Guarda, è davvero difficile rispondere perché non riesco ad immedesimarmi negli altri, è davvero  difficile capire cosa motiva uno tra le centinaia di persone cche si autodefiniscono artisti, dalle persone che dipingono quadri di fiori,fiori graziosi,alle persone che girano lacittà e cercano di fotografare ppersone in situazioni disperate e persone che scrivono del loro paese talvolta in modo artefatto, talvolta verosimile, è davvero difficile sapere cosa motivi persone così diverse tra loro. Credo che un artista sia per me alla continua ricerca di definire la propria vita, essere un artista è un modo di esprimere la propria identità in un modo, o in un altro. Alcuni amano esprimere la propria identità attraverso una riflessione politica o facendo politica, mentre altri, me incluso, preferiscono un approccio più psicologico, filosofico, basato sull’esperienza umana.

 .

Che tipo di relazione esiste o si crea tra te e i soggetti che ritrai nei tuoi ritratti?

Allora, la prima cosa da dire è che la relazione è sempre stata molto buona: non puoi lavorare nei luoghi in cui ho  lavorato negli ultimo trent’anni senza avere un buon rapporto, sarebbe assolutamente impossibile anche abbastanza pericoloso: le persone per strada non hanno soldi, cercano di sopravvivere. Ho incontrato persone che hanno ucciso altri esseri umani, perciò, se non hai un buon rapporto con loro e non riesci ad andarci d’accordo non puoi fare i progetti che sto facendo io. Le relazioni sono quindi sempre come una strada a doppio senso: dai e ricevi e io ho cercato di aiutare  le persone al meglio che potevo com’essere umano e loro amano lavorare con me, in un modo o nell’altro. Vedi, è sempre un rapporto reciproco e posso dirti che ogni giorno mi contattano regolarmente centinaia di persone per chiedermi come va, cosa sto facendo, quando mi vedranno di nuovo. Piaccio davvero alle persone con cui lavoro e loro piacciono molto a me, e questo è il motivo per cui continuo a fare questo lavoro: perché ho un’affinità con il tipo di persone con cui lavoro.

.

La prima volta che vidi, anni fa, i tuoi lavori, pensai immediatamente ad Alejandro Jodorowski. Lei sa che nei suoi film c’è sempre un leitmotiv inquietante. Perché lei scelse, e continua a farlo, di presentare al proprio pubblico quest’esaltazione estetica dell’inquietante?

Non posso davvero rispondere alla domanda perché alla fine è come chiedere perché ami il  rosso, il blu, oil viola, non so, è parte di ciò che sono e se torni indietro di molti anni,è davvero interessante per me guardarmi in modo retrospettivo, puoi vedere che da quanto ero un adolescente, da quando avevo vent’anni, ho avuto a che fare con questo tipo di personaggi: in un modo o nell’altro, è semplicemente parte della mia identità,della mia essenza. E’davvero difficile per me sire perché mi attraggono. Sai, è davvero cruciale capirlo, credo che molte persone non colgano questo aspetto della fotografia. Chiunque potrebbe camminare in una parte a caso del mondo, sia Roma,Milano, New York o Johannesburg, e troverebbe soggetti interessanti che assomigliano ad alcuni dei miei soggetti, in un modo o nell’altro. Mi hanno sempre detto che trovare i soggetti da ritrarre è solo il cinque per cento della fotografia, non il novantacinque. Tu trovi qualcosa o qualcuno da ritrarre se sei al cinque per cento. ‘Oh, questa persona sembra interessante’. E poi cosa fai? Cosa fai a quella persona? Vedi, è come dire ‘Credo che questo sia un bel tramonto, o quella una bella montagna o quest’altro un buon odore’ e scrive un libro di poesie o di filosofia: c’è una differenza enorme tra trovare qualcosa che abbia belle caratteristiche e trasformarlo in un oggetto estetico che abbia del valore abbastanza duraturo, è una differenza enorme. Quindi quello di cui tu chiedi è il risultato estetico, più che laa natura obbiettiva dei soggetti che ritraggo.

.

Nel suo ultimo lavoro, pubblicato nel 2014, Asylum of the Birds, il leitmotiv sono gli uccelli. Non è naturalmente il primo autore a parlare di volatili,e forse un confronto con Hitchcock è eccessivamente comodo, ma Hitchcock era ornitofobico ed era terrorizzato dagli uccelli. Alla fine di ‘Outland’ lei dice che ha un altro tipo di rapporti con i volatili, dice di ammirarli. Mi può spiegare cosa intende, anche in relazione al suo Asilo dei Volatili?

 Credo di amare tutto ciò si trovi in natura. Ho come animali domestici serpenti, ragni,e amo un sacco di cose che normalmente le persone non amano. A dire il vero amo qualsiasi cosa, non c’è nulla che non mi piaccia veramente. Ho un’affinità con qualsiasi cosa appartenga  al mondo naturale e quindi, vedi, ho usato gli uccelli come una metafora. Se leggi la Bibbia, o addirittura libri antecedenti, i volatili hanno una funzione direi archetipica: sono simbolo di purezza, sono il legame tra il paradiso e la terra e c’è quindi qualcosa di archetipico riguardo loro che rimane comune inalterato in ogni cultura. Rappresentano qualcosa di celestiale e io ho cercato di creare in questo libro un legame tra il paradiso, e il simbolo del paradiso, i volatili, e il mondo di Roger Ballen, con il mio spazio e la mia estetica e legarli in qualche modo attraverso la trasformazione della macchina fotografica. Ho creato un’altra estetica con questo legame, attraverso questo rapporto, tra la metafora degli uccelli e la metafora del mondo di Roger Ballen, e l’essenza del  mio lavoro è questa, cercare di capire questa metafora. Sai, ogni fotografia è diversa dalle altre, ma una volta che vai a fondo e capisci la metafora che ti rappresenta, ci sono molte metafore ma la tua metafora può chiarire molte cose di te stesso se viene colta

.

Ultima domanda che mi piacerebbe porle: se si guarda allo specchio, cosa vede?

Senz’altro un’altra buona domanda perché lo faccio ogni mattino e diverse alter volte durante il giorno, per andare nel bagno degli uomini eccetera… beh, credo ci siano due cose da vedere, due cose a cui penso sempre. La prima è ‘Sono davvero io?’ Perché lo specchio non è necessariamente una rappresentazione di te, è basato anche sulla fisica ddello specchio, quindi ciò che vedi non è necessariamente come sei, è composto dalla fisica dello specchio e da quella della tua mente. La seconda cosa è credo che mi chiedo sempre come appaia a me stesso. Ora ho 65 anni e osservo sempre che sto invecchiando ogni giorno di più e i segni dell’età sono inquietanti. Devo capire di focalizzarmi sulle cose che sono davvero importanti per me nella vita.

 

Scrivi

La tua email non sarà pubblicata